Saturday, November 30, 2013

Aquaculture view: Environmentally sustainable aquaculture production: a nutritionist’s perspective


Aquaculture view

Aquaculture view is a column in each edition of International Aquafeed magazine (IAF), written by Dominique P Bureau.

Part of the IAF editorial panel, Dom has a PhD in Nutritional Sciences from the University of Guelph, Canada.

Today he teaches various undergraduate and graduate courses on animal nutrition and agriculture at the University of Guelph. Between 2007 and 2009, he coordinated the “Paris Semester”, a study abroad program for undergraduate students at the University of Guelph.

He serves on a number of international committees, including the US National Research Council Committee on Nutrient Requirements of Fish and Shrimp.





See all of the Aquaculture view columns here.


November - December 2013

Environmentally sustainable aquaculture production: a nutritionist’s perspective 

Rearing fish and crustaceans in an intensive manner involves the transformation of dietary inputs into fish biomass. This process generates waste, which in many cases can be difficult to contain and recover. The release of waste into aquatic ecosystems by aquaculture operations may result in nutrient enrichment of these ecosystems which, in turn, can potentially lead to environmental changes.

In North America and Europe, the potential (or hypothetical) environmental impacts that can be brought on by aquaculture have been a major issue raised (and highly publicised) by a number of environmental non-governmental agencies (eNGOs), environmental activists and various competing end-users (e.g. recreational users). I have always felt that the aquaculture sector constitutes an easy target in the popular press due to its status as a relatively new industry (a new kid on the block!). I also believe that aquaculture has been targeted because a relatively small number of fish farming operators, notably salmon cage culture operations on the east and west coasts of Canada and the USA, are located in what can be described as ‘playgrounds’ for city dwellers. 

Nonetheless, there is no point having sour grapes and we must effectively and ethically address challenges head on. There is a growing consensus around the world that aquaculture operations, notably those operating in sensitive areas, should act in increasingly environmental and socio-economically sustainable manners.

The origins of waste
Nutrition plays a very important role in the types and amounts of waste released by aquaculture operations. The release of solid waste is mainly a function of the digestibility of the feeds served to the animals, and the release of dissolved wastes is mainly a function of the metabolism of absorbed nutrients by the fish. Consequently nutrient mass balances and nutritional strategies, respectively, offer direct and effective ways of predicting and managing waste output by aquaculture operations. 
The stakeholders in the aquaculture industry can globally be described as good environmental stewards. Very significant reductions in waste outputs per unit of biomass produced have been achieved over the past few decades by commercial aquaculture operations, notably in Europe and the Americas. Significant changes have started to take place, or are expected to take place, in the rest of the world. Further reduction in waste outputs are currently being achieved through the fine-tuning of feed formulations, judicious use of feed additives, and the processing or refining of ingredients. Numerous ongoing R&D efforts may also contribute to the development of effective strategies for further reducing the waste outputs of aquaculture operations.

The real impacts of waste
It is important to note that the ‘release of waste’ by aquaculture operations cannot be systematically equated with ‘deleterious environmental changes’, as it is frequently assumed in much of the documentation of eNGOs, the popular press and even the scientific literature on aquaculture. For example, a large scale research effort on the impact of freshwater aquaculture at the Experimental Lakes Area of Ontario, Canada led by Dr. Cheryl Podemski (Fisheries and Oceans Canada) convincingly demonstrated that environmental impacts induced by rainbow trout cage culture in an ultra-oligotrophic lake were actually very largely positive, notably the for usually-fragile native (wild) lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) populations. An overview of the project can be found at the following URL: http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/science/publications/article/2007/27-09-2007-eng.htm

This great research project, as well as other similar studies, showed that the types and potential magnitude of the ‘environmental changes’ are highly dependent on the biological, chemical, and physical characteristics of the receiving ecosystems.  Different water bodies will react differently to the influx of the same amount of certain wastes (e.g. solid organic matter, solid or dissolved nitrogenous or phosphorus wastes). 

Besides being driven by complex interactions between biological, chemical, and physical factors, the perception of these changes will also be dependent on numerous socio-economic factors. For example, a slight increase in primary productivity (e.g. microalgae) or secondary productivity may be perceived negatively in areas where tourism and recreational activities are significant. The same increases in primary and secondary productivities could potentially be perceived as neutral, or even beneficial, in areas where environmental degradation has already taken place, or in regions where the natural productivity of water bodies is limited, and wild fish and invertebrate harvests play important roles in the regional economy. The expectations and value systems of the various local stakeholders play a great role in the definition of ‘assimilative capacity’ and ‘environmental impacts’. These parameters are not as objective as they are often assumed to be.

Several studies have shown that the estimation of waste outputs from aquaculture operations can quite easily be done with nutrient mass balance models. However, the assessment and prediction of the potential environmental impacts associated with the release of waste from aquaculture operations represent a much greater challenge which generally requires a multidisciplinary approach (a team composed of fish biologists, limnologists, benthic habitat specialists, oceanographers, modellers, nutritionists etc.), as well as great effort and investments.

Engaging in the dialogue
I feel that the aquaculture nutrition community should play a more important role in the ongoing dialogue about the real impacts of aquaculture operations. We need to seek to engage the public in healthy and realistic dialogue. A popular bumper sticker in the parking lot of my university is “If you ate today, thank a farmer!” This very simple message conveys effectively that food production is not merely an ‘accessory’ activity. It is essential to our daily survival and standard of living. It is at least as important (in the greater scheme of things) than leisurely endeavours, such as holidaying, boating, water skiing, surfing or sport fishing. I am always a bit disappointed by how few eNGOS are truly engaged in raising awareness of the very broad and profound impacts on aquatic ecosytems caused by sprawling development of housing or recreational infrastructure around bodies of water. I guess you don’t really want to bite the hand that feeds you …

Agree, disagree? Any suggestions of topics? Let me know at dbureau@uoguelph.ca, or in the comments below.

Dr Kang-Sen Mai, professor of aquaculture nutrition at the Ocean University of China, Qingdao

Dr Kang-Sen Mai is a professor specializing in aquaculture nutrition at the Ocean University of China, Qingdao. He currently focuses on fish species native to China and as a member of the Chinese Academy of Engineering plays a major role in shaping the country’s aquaculture policy.
As this issue goes to press he will be speaking at the Ninth Symposium of the World’s Chinese Scientists on Nutrition and Feeding of Finfish and Shellfish (SWCSNFFS) on the subject of the sustainable development of China’s aquaculture and feed industry.
Dr Mai is also the Associate Editor (China) of International Aquafeed magazine, and has this year supervised the editing and translation of its first Chinese edition.

This interview appeared in the November December edition of International Aquafeed magazine



Tell me about the kind of research you specialize in

My major was initially aquaculture for my BSc. Since my postgraduate studies for MSc (Ocean University of China) and PhD (National University of Ireland), my research has specialised in aquaculture nutrition and feeds. I have been working in this field for more than 30 years.
What does your current research topic address?
My current research topics are mainly on the nutritional physiology and nutrient quantitative requirements of the representative mariculture species in China, such as turbot, yellow croaker, seabass, and groupers.
I am interested particularly in the comparative studies on the protein metabolism among carnivorous, omnivorous and herbivorous fish, and the replacement of fishmeal by alternative protein sources in their feeds.

How important is SWCSNFFS for Chinese aquaculture science?

SWCSNFFS has made great contributions to Chinese aquaculture science. It is well known that China has a 3000-year history of aquaculture. However, the rapid development of Chinese aquaculture took place only after the establishment of China’s aquafeed industry in 1980s. As I have said, there is no modern aquaculture without a modern aquafeed industry.
The first SWCSNFFS was held in Guangzhou in 1992 with only about 100 participants. Now there are nearly 1,000 participants, from both academia and industry. Thus, SWCSNFFS's influence has obviously been growing. It has been indicated that the participants benefit a lot from their attendance of the symposium.
There are three major reasons, I think, for the success of SWCSNFFS. Firstly, in order to let more participants focus on a professional symposium, we decided to combine SWCSNFFS with the annual meeting of the China Society of Fisheries’ Subcommittee on Nutrition and Feed in 2003. Secondly, we have always insisted on the principle that SWCSNFFS is a purely academic conference, not allowing too strong a commercial colour, such as product exhibitions or marketing activities. Thirdly, SWCSNFFS invites not only global Chinese aquaculture nutritionists, but also the most famous non-Chinese scientists in aquaculture nutrition around the world, making SWCSNFFS to become one of the world’s really open communication platforms in aquaculture nutrition and feed.

What can the rest of the world learn from the symposium that it can't learn anywhere else?

China is the most important country for aquaculture in the world. Most challenges to the sustainable development to global aquaculture, especially those related to aquafeeds, are usually first faced by China. Hence, the rest of the world can learn the methodologies and experiences from China to overcome these challenges. They can also play the role of early warning for other countries. In addition, the above-mentioned three successful experiences of this symposium can also be learned by other countries.

What is the biggest emerging problem for Chinese aquaculture?

After 30 years of rapid development, Chinese aquaculture is facing a series of emerging problems. Shortages in farming space and raw materials for feed, water quality deterioration, and the safety of aquaculture products are considered to be the most critical factors that impede the sustainability of Chinese aquaculture.
Chinese aquaculture produces over 60 percent of the world's total production volume. How is China playing a role in developing sustainable practices around the world?
As I mentioned above, since China is the biggest country for aquaculture, making its sustainable development is the duty of China. All of its successful experiences to solve the emerging problems can play a role in developing sustainable practices around the world.

How can the feed industry stay sustainable in the face of rising demand from the global population?

In my opinion, in order to make the feed industry sustainable to meet the rising demand of the global population, we must develop new technologies to use a wider range of new feed ingredients: in particular to reduce and even go without marine sources of raw materials, such as fish meal or fish oil. We must also improve feed efficiency, reduce environmental pollution and ensure food quality and safety.

Welcome aboard the magazine as our new Associate Editor for China. Do you have any comments on the future?

From my point of view, International Aquafeed should become a real international magazine. It should be a medium that lets China’s academia and industry, which produces more than 60 percent of the world’s aquafeeds, get to know well the new developments in this field outside of China. At the same time it should also let the world know what is happening in China, allowing this publication to have a really global influence.

Friday, November 29, 2013

29/11/13: Peruvian exports; Aran aquaculture on hold

Peruvian aquaculture exports will have reached US$250 million by the end of 2013, according to forecasts from the South American country’s Assoication of Exporters (ADEX). This will mark an explosive growth of over 20 percent on 2012 levels.

Association president Eduardo Amorrotu told press agency Andina that he sees no reason why future production figures can’t be higher still: “We have important areas on the coast, in the lakes and rivers and in the mountains, and in the jungle. All this is a huge potential that we are not using.”
Read more …

“Fundamental errors” in risk assessments have stopped a planned Irish salmon farm in its tracks.  The Aran Islands aquaculture facility had been permitted on the basis of three research papers from the Marine Institute in Oranmore, Ireland, which an independent team comprised of Canadian, Norwegian and Scottish scientists flagged up as methodologically suspect in August. EU Environment Commissioner Janez Potocnik has re-opened an investigation on the proposed 1,126 acre site.

Independent MEP for North-West Ireland Marian Harkin has voiced her approval of the developments. “This decision is a significant indication of how the democratic process can be used by NGOs to challenge possible infringements of process,” she said.
Read more …

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A wild coast on Inishmore, largest of the Aran...
A wild coast on Inishmore, largest of the Aran Islands (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Dr Eckel

Dr Eckel GmbH specialises in high quality alternative feed additives for livestock and fish applications. Its Anta Phyt Aqua feed won a Silver Innovation Award at the most recent VICTAM Asia show.

Thursday, November 28, 2013

28/11/13: Event: 16th International Symposium on Fish Nutrition and Feeding (ISFNF XVI)

 
The 16th International Symposium on Fish Nutrition
and Feeding (ISFNF) will take place in May 2014
Situated near the magnificent Great Barrier Reef, the tropical city of Cairns, Australia is the setting for the 16th International Symposium on Fish Nutrition and Feeding (ISFNF), a premier international event sponsored by MCI Australia,

What will the symposium involve?
ISFNF will be an opportunity to discuss and debate the current and looming issues faced by the fish nutrition sector with an idea of developing innovative and novel ways to overcome them.

Through a combination of formal and informal functions, ISFNF will offer the opportunity to network, socialise and collaborate with other like-minded members of the industry. 

A ‘gap day’ has also been planned as part of the structured programme, allowing for greater networking opportunities and the chance to explore the area.

When/where is the symposium?
ISFNF will take place from 25 - 30 May 2014 at the Cairns Convention Centre, Australia.

For a full breakdown of the programme and details on how to register, visit the ISFNF website here...

28/11/13: Rolls-Royce designs fish carrier; marine algae spot treatment; Kenya's 20 tonne fish factory

Manufacturing firm Rolls-Royce is designing a boat that will allow the transportation of salmon.
 
The 250-foot vessel, built for Danish salmon producer Bakkafrost, will transport live fish from open-ocean fish farms direct to factories. The largest of its kind, the vessel will include three holds with the capcity to hold 3,000 cubic meters of water.  
Full article available here...
 
Scientists from the University of Stirling, Scotland, UK have discovered an unlikely treatment for acne – marine algae.
 
Research conducted at the University’s internationally renowned Institute of Aquaculture revealed that the cleansing qualities of certain fatty acids found in algae can help prevent the growth of Propionibacterium acnes, a bacterium which causes the common skin condition.
Full story available here...
 
According to news aggregator allAfrica, a new fish processing factory has been set up in Tharaka-Nithi County, Kenya.
 
With a capacity to handle over 20,000 kilograms of fish per day, the Mt Kenya Fish Company is targeting tilapia, catfish and trout farmers throughout the region.
Full story available here...
 
 
 
File:Flag of Kenya.svg
Flag of Kenya (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
 
 

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

27/11/13: A Thanksgiving message from all here at the Aquaculturists!


Sent the eve of holiday, as tomorrow you should be with family

When the Pilgrims first gathered together to share with their Indian friends in the mild autumn air,
they lifted the voices in jubilant praise for the bread on the table, the berries & maize,
for field & for forest,
for turkey & deer,
for the bountiful crops they were blessed with that year
They were thankful for these as they feasted away,
& as they were thankful we're thankful today!

File:RoastTurkey.jpg
Roast Turkey (Photo credit: Wikipedia)



Sent the eve of holiday, as tomorrow you should be with family.

When the Pilgrims first gathered together to share with their Indian friends in the mild autumn air,
they lifted the voices in jubilant praise for the bread on the table, the berries & maize,
for field & for forest,
for turkey & deer,
for the bountiful crops they were blessed with that year
They were thankful for these as they feasted away,
& as they were thankful we're thankful today - See more at: http://gfmt.blogspot.co.uk/#sthash.7uswW5jz.dpuf
Sent the eve of holiday, as tomorrow you should be with family.

When the Pilgrims first gathered together to share with their Indian friends in the mild autumn air,
they lifted the voices in jubilant praise for the bread on the table, the berries & maize,
for field & for forest,
for turkey & deer,
for the bountiful crops they were blessed with that year
They were thankful for these as they feasted away,
& as they were thankful we're thankful today - See more at: http://gfmt.blogspot.co.uk/#sthash.7uswW5jz.dpuf
Sent the eve of holiday, as tomorrow you should be with family.

When the Pilgrims first gathered together to share with their Indian friends in the mild autumn air,
they lifted the voices in jubilant praise for the bread on the table, the berries & maize,
for field & for forest,
for turkey & deer,
for the bountiful crops they were blessed with that year
They were thankful for these as they feasted away,
& as they were thankful we're thankful today - See more at: http://gfmt.blogspot.co.uk/#sthash.7uswW5jz.dpuf
Sent the eve of holiday, as tomorrow you should be with family.

When the Pilgrims first gathered together to share with their Indian friends in the mild autumn air,
they lifted the voices in jubilant praise for the bread on the table, the berries & maize,
for field & for forest,
for turkey & deer,
for the bountiful crops they were blessed with that year
They were thankful for these as they feasted away,
& as they were thankful we're thankful today - See more at: http://gfmt.blogspot.co.uk/#sthash.7uswW5jz.dpuf
Sent the eve of holiday, as tomorrow you should be with family.

When the Pilgrims first gathered together to share with their Indian friends in the mild autumn air,
they lifted the voices in jubilant praise for the bread on the table, the berries & maize,
for field & for forest,
for turkey & deer,
for the bountiful crops they were blessed with that year
They were thankful for these as they feasted away,
& as they were thankful we're thankful today - See more at: http://gfmt.blogspot.co.uk/#sthash.7uswW5jz.dpuf
Sent the eve of holiday, as tomorrow you should be with family.

When the Pilgrims first gathered together to share with their Indian friends in the mild autumn air,
they lifted the voices in jubilant praise for the bread on the table, the berries & maize,
for field & for forest,
for turkey & deer,
for the bountiful crops they were blessed with that year
They were thankful for these as they feasted away,
& as they were thankful we're thankful today - See more at: http://gfmt.blogspot.co.uk/#sthash.7uswW5jz.dpuf
Sent the eve of holiday, as tomorrow you should be with family.

When the Pilgrims first gathered together to share with their Indian friends in the mild autumn air,
they lifted the voices in jubilant praise for the bread on the table, the berries & maize,
for field & for forest,
for turkey & deer,
for the bountiful crops they were blessed with that year
They were thankful for these as they feasted away,
& as they were thankful we're thankful today - See more at: http://gfmt.blogspot.co.uk/#sthash.7uswW5jz.dpuf

Dinnissen

Dinnissen has more than six decades of experience in feeding/discharging technologies, specialised machine development, processing, control, automation and engineering. Click on image to visit Dinnissen's website.

27/11/13: Event: World Aquaculture Sociey introduces new industry AquaForum concept

The World Aquaculture Sociey recently
announced a new industry AquaForum concept
set to take place in Korea in 2015
News courtesy of the World Aquaculture Society (WAS)

The World Aquaculture Society recently announced that a new forum, aimed at enhancing industry participation will take place in 2015.

The new concept will be formally announced at the upcoming Asian Pacific Aquaculture event which takes place from 10- 13 December in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

AquaForum has been created to benefit industry professionals during WAS conferences and exhibitions. The organizing committee for WA15 invites Asian farmers, feed millers, suppliers, and other industry professionals to Jeju, Korea to attend this forum.  Activities will include specific topical industry sessions, facilitated workshops, round table discussions, simultaneous translations, designated meeting spaces, farm tours, etc. 

This 1st AquaForum is targeted towards the most important industry issues affecting key Asia Pacific aquaculture producing countries.  It is a true Industry forum whereby timely topical and regionally relevant sessions are tailored to enhance industrial representation and participation.
 
The 1st AquaForum will be comprised of industry sessions, each with up to 3 speakers (20-minutes per presentation) plus time for facilitated and simultaneous translated panel and group discussions. Top professionals will be invited to attend the panel discussions.
 
What will AquaForum include?
 - Flatfish Health: Nursery growth inhibition; Grow-out issues etc.
 - Shrimp Health and System Microbial Management:  Farm management practices; Epidemiology and disease control.
 - Aqua Feed technologies: Feed production Technologies; Raw materials and formulation strategies; Functional nutrition. 
 - Marine Finfish Technologies: Production systems; Health, Breeding and Larviculture.
 - Enhancing Shellfish Production: Production systems; Seed production; Quality, Safety, Marketing.
- Integrated Aquaculture: Aquaponics; Seaweeds and Bioremediation; Multitrophic systems; Offshore energy production and aquaculture.
 
Advanced registration is highly recommended to reserve seating and translation services for attendees.  All WA 15 conference attendees and exhibition visitors are welcome to attend the 1st AquaForum. 

However, for those without advanced AquaForum registration, seating and translation services will be provided on a first come first served basis according to availability.
 
Participation in an electronic mailing list to receive ongoing updated information on the AquaForum will be available for all registered attendees. 

When is the AquaForum?
The forum is set to take place from 27-29 May 2015 in Jeju Island, Korea.

Registration on the WAS website will be open from January 2014 onwards. 
For more information, visit the WAS website here.

27/11/13: Trinidad and Tobago hatchery to boost aquaculture; Dubai's pioneer project; North Sea traders fined

Devant Maharaj, food production minister, Trinidad and Tobago has announced plans to boost the country's annual aquaculture production.

The government has commissioned a TTD$1.8 million aquaculture hatchery, extension and training facility at the Sugar Cane Feeds Centre (SFC) in Chaguanas, central Trinidad.  

Maharaj said the new facility has the potential to boost annual production to 475 tonnes over a five-year period. 
Full news available here...

A new partnership between Dubai based maritime centre Dubai Maritime City and Norwegian salmon farming firm SalMar ASA is set to launch a first-of-its-kind salmon venture. 

The new partnership has received the support of the Dubai Cooperative Society for Fishermen, a government entity that works to meet fishermen’s needs. 
Full news avaialble here...

Four European North Sea traders - Heiploeg, Klaas Puul, Kok Seafood, all of the Netherlands and Stührk, Germany have been fined a total of € 28 716 000 after news of a cartel operation in breach of EU antitrust rules, according to the European Commission.

It is alleged that between June 2000 and January 2009 Heiploeg and Klaas Puul agreed to fix prices and share sales volumes of North Sea shrimps in Belgium, France, Germany and the Netherlands. Kok Seafood participated at least from February 2005 and Stührk was involved in price fixing in Germany in the period from March 2003 to November 2007.
Full report available here...




English: Trinidad and Tobago (orthographic pro...
 Trinidad and Tobago (Photo credit: Wikipedia)




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27/11/13: Biofuel production in marine algae: Scripps Oceanography graduate student develops sustainable fuel alternative

A scanning electron microscope image of the
diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana.
(Photo credit: Scripps Institution of Oceanography,
University of California,
San Diego, USA)
News provided by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, USA for the Aquaculturists

In repsonse to an ever-increasing dependence on traditional fossil fuels, graduate student from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, USA has developed a method to genetically engineer a key growth component in biofuel production.

Emily Trentacoste led the research in to developing a method for greatly enhancing biofuel production in tiny marine algae.

Currently, a significant roadblock in algal biofuel research surrounds the production of lipid oils, (the fat molecules that store energy that can be produced for fuel).

Trentacoste and her colleagues used a data set of genetic expression or 'transcriptomic',  to target a specific enzyme inside a group of microscopic algae known as diatoms (Thalassiosira pseudonana).

By metabolically engineering a “knock-down” of fat-reducing enzymes called lipases, the researchers were able to increase lipids without compromising growth. The genetically altered strains they developed, the researchers say, could be produced broadly in other species.

“These results demonstrate that targeted metabolic manipulations can be used to increase accumulation of fuel-relevant molecules.… with no negative effects on growth,” said Trentacoste. “We have shown that engineering this pathway is a unique and practical approach for increasing lipid yields.”

“Scientifically this is a huge achievement,” said Mark Hildebrand, marine biology professor at Scripps and co-author of the study. “Five years ago people said you would never be able to get more lipids without affecting growth negatively. This paper shows that there isn’t an intrinsic barrier and gives us hope of more new things that we can try—it opens the door to a lot more work to be done.”

As well as lowering the cost of biofuel production by increasing lipid content. Due to the efficient screening process used in the new study, the new method has led to advances in the speed of algal biofuel crop production due to the efficient screening process used in the new study.

“Maintaining high growth rates and high biomass accumulation is imperative for algal biofuel production on large economic scales,” the authors note in the paper.

“It seems especially fitting that Scripps-UC San Diego is displaying so much leadership in the field of sustainable biofuels from algae, for instance with the California Center for Algae Biotechnology starting here, given the history of the institution playing such a pivotal role in climate change research,” said paper coauthor William Gerwick, a distinguished professor of oceanography and pharmaceutical sciences at Scripps’s Center for Marine Biotechnology and Biomedicine and UC San Diego’s Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. 

“But these advances do not happen in isolation, and the current project is a great illustration of how different labs can collaborate to achieve greater advances than possible singly.”

For more information, visit the Scripps Institution of Oceanography website here.

Tuesday, November 26, 2013

Bühler

Bühler is a specialist and technology partner for plant, equipment, and services for processing basic foods and for manufacturing advanced materials. Click on image to visit Bühler's website

26/11/13: First Estonian prawn fishery certified sustainable

News courtesy of the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC)

An Estonian prawn fishery has achieved Marine Stewardship Council certification following a year-long scientific assessment.

Prawns from the Barents Sea fishery, sold in Scandinavia, throughout Europe, Russia, Japan and China, will now be eligible to bear the MSC ecolabel.

“This is the first Estonian fishery to achieve MSC certification and we look forward to welcoming other fisheries from the Baltic States in the near future,” said Minna Epps, manager for MSC, Baltic Sea region.

MSC certification is a mark of quality and sustainability, confirming that stocks are being properly managed.

With an abundance of Northern prawns (Pandalus borealis) in the Barents Sea, since 2006 total catches in the fishery have been significantly below the permitted levels and the stock level has been close to the maximum that the ecosystem can support throughout the history of the fishery.

“Obtaining the MSC ecolabel for sustainable fishing is a logical step in our approach to the market. Long term sustainability has always been at the heart of our company’s quality strategy, and therefore it was straightforward for us to adopt the MSC standards," said Mati Sarevet, fisheries director, Estonia. 
Visit the MSC website here....



English: A heap of Pandalus borealis shrimp. O...
 A heap of Pandalus borealis shrimp (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
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26/11/13: Climate modelling system use in aquaculture; Brazil suspends entry of Argentinian shrimp; global centre for Great White conservation

A comprehensive climate system model from the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) and the Australian  Bureau of Meteorology could provide a boost to Australia's aquaculture industries.

Commenting on the use of the system in aquaculture, Dr Claire Spillman, research scientist at the Bureau of Meteorology said it is proving extremely useful to Tasmania's fastest growing industry. 
Full report available here...

The Federal Court of Brazil has announced it has suspended the entry of Argentinean shrimp (Pleoticus muelleri) into the Brazilian market.

The suspension is part of the country's aim to protect domestic production after the Brazilian Association of Shrimp Breeders (ABCC) filed an injunction to prevent the entry of the wild crustacean from Argentina.
Full report available here... 

Dubbed 'seafood capital of the world', Port Lincoln, South Australia is the proposed setting for a momentous conservation development. 

The Global Centre for Great White Shark Conservation has announced plans to develop a world-class floating aquarium off the protected coast of Port Lincoln.

In a bid to help protect the Great White and promote conservation of the species, the centre aims to accommodate a live shark in the world's first ocean aquarium.
Full news available here...





Great white shark (Carcharodon carcharias) off...
Great white shark (Carcharodon carcharias) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)


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Monday, November 25, 2013

25/11/13: Event: International Aquaculture focus on South Australia in 2014

It is anticipated that the World Aquaculture Adelaide
conference will be one of the largest ever held in South Australia
News courtesy of the World Aquaculture Society (WAS)

South Australia’s world-renowned aquaculture sector will be under
the spotlight next year as Adelaide
plays host to the World Aquaculture Adelaide Conference.

Gail Gago, minister for agriculture, food and fisheries, South Australia said winning the hosting rights was a coup for South Australia, with between 2,000 to 3,000 delegates expected to attend and inject up to AUD$11.5 million into the state’s economy.

“Port Lincoln just hosted the Australian seafood industry national conference, and now with the premier international aquaculture science and industry event coming to Adelaide next year, it shows how well regarded South Australia is as a producer of premium and safe seafood from a clean aquatic environment,” Gago said.

“Hosting the conference presents a fantastic opportunity to showcase to the international industry our production techniques, regulatory frameworks, research and innovation as well as the growing connection between aquaculture and tourism.”

It is anticipated that the conference will be one of the largest ever held in South Australia.
Minister Gago said with South Australian aquaculture production at the farm gate valued at over AUD$241 million and the sector now making up more than 54% of the state’s seafood production, the industry is a significant employer, particularly in regional areas.

“The recently released independent Economic Impact of Aquaculture on the South Australian State and Regional Economies for 2011-12 shows the value of aquaculture production grew 11% on the previous year, up by more than AUD$23 million,” Gago added.

“These aquaculture businesses are regional businesses, and it is testament to the ingenuity and enterprise of regional communities that they continue to grow and prosper.

“Aquaculture is one of the great success stories of regional employment and innovation, directly generating 1,147 full time jobs and another 1,510 indirectly, 65% of which are based outside the greater Adelaide area.”



Chair of the conference steering committee and President-elect of the World Aquaculture Society Dr Graham Mair said with aquaculture one of the fastest growing food producing sectors in the world, the conference and its theme of ‘Create Nurture Grow’ will showcase industry success stories.

For more information, visit the conference website here.